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came during a hearing on u.s. security threats. janet napolitano and the fbi associate director also testified. this is an hour and 50 minutes. >> the hearing will come to order. good morning to all. this is our annual, our committee's annual home lapd threat assessment hearing -- homeland threat assessment hearing. i want to welcome back janet napolitano, secretary of department of homeland security, and matt olsen, and the associate deputy director, kevin perkins, who is standing in for director bob mueller today. the director had to undergo unexpected surgery resulting from complications associated with recent dental treatment. he's unable to join us today. but we welcome mr. perkins in his stead. we with confidence we extend best regards to the director for a speedy recovery. this will be the final time that i have the privilege of chairing this annual hearing, so i want to use this opportunity to thank each of you for your leadership in our nation's homeland security and counterterrorism efforts through you to thank those who work with you in each of your departments or agencies
units of marines fan out to these countries, fbi agents are being sent to libya to investigate the murder of the american ambassador there and three other americans were killed. the fbi. we think of the fbi as a domestic agency, it's the fbi that's part of the u.s. government that has the authority to investigate deaths of americans in all other parts of the world. fbi did it in the embassy bombings in kenya, in tanzania in 1998, and the "uss cole" bombing in 2000 and mumbai bombings in india in 2008 and now the fbi is investigating in libya or at least we're told they are on their way. the fbi being dispatched to libya is yet another reminder what happened in libya appears to be a different kettle of fish than what is happening at all the other embassies and u.s. sites around the world today. the attack that killed the u.s. ambassador in libya appears to have been a coordinated, military-style assault by well-armed men who arrived at the scene quite separately from any civilian protest. given the militant groups known to operate in the area of benghazi and the types of attacks
of the terrorism training camps. met weathered and mohamed and the fbi was interested in him. faris was questioned beginning in mar of 2003. and during the interviews with faris, he mentioned the conversation they had with and the idea of shooting up a shopping mall. and also the name of christopher paul, the third man at this coffee shop came up. authorities started to piece it together and eventually in a sort of slow domino effect, the three were arrested and charged. so faris, the pakistan immigrant was ultimately pleaded guilty to two chargeses of terrorism-related crimes. he pleaded guilty in a secret closed deal in may in virginia. may of 2003. the idea was that he had a lot to have offer the government and he might be able to get a reduction in the sentence based orb the information he could provide. unfortunately the case leaked, and government was forced to publicize his conviction that june. and at that point, everything went to heck. he was upset. he lost the bargaining chip. they were extremely interested in the somali immigrant. he ran a cell phone shop and had a family. they were tr
don't have the answer to that yet. we know the fbi is in libya right now. they arrived on tuesday. they're joining other u.s. officials as well as libyans there to investigate the attack, and i think right now we're still hearing from libyan officials. then this was preplanned. in other words, that the attackers used that protest against the anti-muslim film as a dediversion, and others say it wasn't necessarily preplanned, but it was an attack that was mounted with heavy machinery and heavy weaponry against both the consulate and also we shouldn't forget a mile away from the consulate in what was considered a safehouse. >> it's cluner how long the fbi will be there to gather their information. thank you so much. appreciate it where are. >>> what can our past tell us about our future? the attack of the u.s. consulate in libya is not the first time america has been targeted like that? up next we talk with a man who was national security advisor in 1979 when the u.s. embassy was taken over in iran. and a controversial experiment to reduce the number of murders in el salvador. ahhhh
have been trying to gather the facts and did not want to get ahead of the f.b.i. investigation. >> shep: the polls are indicating that the president has taken a hit on foreign policy, ed. >> absolutely. he's doing better on the economy against mitt romney. but another poll shows his ap handling foreign policy, it's down to 49%. disapproval is up to 46%. that suggests a weakness there in part because of what's happened in the last week or so. and that's why the romney campaign is jumping on it. take a listen. >> the american people will judge him on the fact, are we more influential around the world and we are not. >> interesting, because before the argument about are you better off four years from now was about the economy. you see the romney campaign adjusting it to national security. their spokesman was the president has not only taken out key al-qaeda leaders, but point out they believe mitt romney was the one who jumped in and commented on all this violence a little too soon. >> shep: ed henry in coral gables. as mentioned, the secretary of state weighed in on this and hillary clint
to government cyber and wisdom sitting next to secret service agents and fbi agents so they're all sharing the information in near real-time, machine to machine speed, not necessarily just human to human. so they can get that overall operational picture to identify cyber risk. and then it becomes actionable because the energy sector person sits there and says, that's important to me in this way, and i need that information to protect my sector which may be different than what the water person sees. so than by doing that and collecting and sharing classified information them unclassified information, per type -- proprietary information, we have a better idea of what activity is and how the activity propagates through these various sectors. so it's something that can be enhanced. is something that can be expanded on that is something that currently exists. >> so that is an effective system, capability to provide the very similar information sharing to what congress would like to legislate. is there an awareness problem? >> i think it's an evolutionary problem. so we started the capability, a
in sending fbi forces to help investigate, find out who was responsible. but i think the thing that was so striking about chris was that he would have wanted them to be brought to justice under a rule of law that reflected the transition libya has made from a truly autocratic state where justice was never guaranteed to one where you could see these people tried in a fair courtroom and sentenced. >> you knew him well. >> i knew him well. >> for how many years? >> at least 20. we go back a long way. he was a wonderful man who had a sense of the streets as well as the elites. and despite the security restrictions that limit so many diplomats, he was always willing to go out. he saw libya through all three transition phases. two years under moammar gadhafi, then the liaison ambassador. >> and he worked hard to get rid of gadhafi through these rebels? >> absolutely. and he has reached out and he really knows the streets. the libyan people. in the same way he's known in every place i've ever known him, he has been one who has really been engaged. when he looks for what role the united states sho
with explosives but his connections were actually undercover fbi agents. the 30 years was the maximum sentence under his plea deal. >>> one of the oldest cold case murders in the u.s. to go to trial is now closed. a judge found a former washington state police officer guilty of killing a 7-year-old girl 55 years ago. jack mccullough told police he took a train to chicago for a medical exam but one of his former girlfriends contacted police four years ago and says she found the train ticket unused and it was dated the day the girl was kidnapped. he is set to be sentenced in november. the "today" show is coming up next. let's find out what they're working on. >> lester holt joins us live from new york. good morning, lester. >> good morning. coming up on a saturday morning on "today" a man linked to the controversial anti-islam filmta overnight as the four men killed in the libyan embassy attack are brought home and honored as heroes and protests continue overseas. we'll have complete coverage of it all. >>> also ahead, britain's royal family is said to be furious over topless photos of kate midd
. it was wildly successful beyond their dreams and to be able to kill the american face in libya. >> the fbi is not commentog the status of its investigation . the agents are on the ground and they are not in benghazi itself . >> gretchen: thank you so much, kelly. >> steve: 67th annual united nation's general assemy will kick off. our president will make a speech but not meet with them. but he will meet with the ladies of the view. that was the topic of rogert bibs and chris wallace. watch >> i want to go back to the un and new york this week. he's got schedules and foreign leaders have schedules, but the president has blocked out time to appear on the view on tuesday, so he has time for whoopy goldberg but not world leaders? >> no, chris, look, the president will be actively involved with the un. >> he's giving a speech. >> chris, they have telephones in the white house. he talked to the leader in libya. we don't need a meeting in washington to confer with leaders. >> but he has -- >> i am sure if he would do an brew with you on fox news, you would have no problem. >> he hasn't. that's not
to the state department that there were increasing security concerns in benghazi? the fbi says it is too dangerous to be in benghazi, which is why none of them are there now. is that because the situation has worsened, or was it always too dangerous? >> as we determine the details of what took place there and how that attack took place, it became clear that there were terrorists who had planned that attack. that is when i came to that conclusion. as to who was involved, what specific groups were involved, i think the investigation that is ongoing hopefully will determine that. >> about a day after? >> it took a while to get some feedback as to what exactly happened at that location. >> there was a threat intelligence reporting back -- eight to read -- there was a thread of intelligence reporting that groups were seeking to coalesce, but there was not anything specific, and certainly not anything specific to the consulate that i am aware of. as far as the risks of the fbi reported, you really would have to ask them why they made that determination. >> did you make the state department awa
and a hateful video that had nothing to do with the united states. >>reporter: the f.b.i. is still investigating exactly what happened and who was behind it. >>heather: thank you, steve, reporting for us from washington, dc. >>gregg: the investigation into this is leading to more questions than answers including whether the raid against the consulate was a spontaneous reaction or a premeditated act of violence. leland vittert is live in egypt with more. >>reporter: right now it is the u.s. government's position from the obama administration that this was a spontaneous protest at the consulate that got out of hand and turned into an attack that killed those four americans including the u.s. ambassador but we are learning new information from the libyan president in an interview, alluding that he thought there was a possibility that al qaeda or another group was behind the attacks and they were very much preplanned and premeditated pointing to a couple of points. first, it happened on 9/11, and the significance of that date cannot be overlooked. it was well coordinated, the attackers were well arm
from all counter terrorism training manuals. seasoned fbi officials are being fired because they are deemed islamophobic. they can't brief our counter-terrorism any more. a report about fort hood that omitted the fact that nadal hassan wrote a paper justifying suicide bombing? megyn: we'll leave it a rhetorical question for now. thank you both so much. one -- i mention this and i was talking about it before. but you think about all the problems we have in this country and we are so divide. but he see what's happening overseas and it should bind us together as a country. look what we are up against. it's about this country versus such an anti-americanism that exists in the world, over what. just ahead, ambassador john bolton will pick up where this conversation left off. what is behind these protests and what are we going to do about this. if ambassador bolton were in place instead of susan rice, what we be telling our president. in "kelly's court," senate candidate liz warren having to defend herself on accusations she may have committed academic fraud. "kelly's court" takes
with explosives but his al qaeda connections were actually undercover fbi agents. 30 years was the maximum sentence under his plea deal. >>> a local undocumented immigrant who says he was scammed out of winning the lottery ticket or a winning lottery ticket is now being held by immigration officials. ramone ortiz hit the lottery in maryland two years ago. because he doesn't have a social security number he asked a co-worker to claim the $450,000 payout. he claims that that co-worker kept the money. ortiz is now suing for fraud. his attorney says the fraud case will still move forward while ortiz's fate is being decided. >> his wife is listed as a party in the lawsuit and she is still here so that's how the case can go forward. >> you covered the story. >> we'll see what happens with them. >>> what's happening with the weather? >> everything is coming up roses today. fall roses. mums. i don't know. beautiful weather outside today. doing a little late fall gardening, early fall gardening, whatever the season is we'll talk about your weekend forecast and [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. your
in tripoli and confirms fbi agents are holding back in the city. we have no confirmation any of the agents have reached benghazi, the scene of the killing of chris stevens and three other americans. that area is not a safe place to operate in if you are american but there are concerns at the crime scene ten days later might be contaminated. likewise confirmed the marine rapid response anti-terrorist squad that was thrown in here last week remains here in tripoli. the embassy is well guarded amid other questions that u.s. military teams were not dispatched fast enough. critics are saying that and some say the security at the consulate in benghazi was not strong enough and might have led to the problems and warnings were not taken from other attacks by militant groups in benghazi in months prior to an attack. militants strong on that side of the country. in defiance of that and honoring the late ambassador, is killing hitting home, we are watching live scenes coming from benghazi of a protest. thousands of people out in the street basically calling on the government in tripoli to do more to
for fbi, not cia. okay? this is a job for the michigan state police, not the department of defense. okay. by the way, by and large most of the information we knew, okay, we knew about umar farouk abdulmutallab, the guy coming into detroit was all foreign derived. i think it was mistake to mirandize him in 50 minutes because our base of him is foreign intelligence. to me the right entry point was, enemy combatant, nation at war, deal with it that way. on the other hand if someone is discovered and prevented in an attack in the united states by the fbi the roots of that information are law enforcement derived. the going in position is we ought to treat this as a law enforcement problem and enter this into the american court system. i suppose if we stayed her long enough we could think of exceptions but in broad measure my sense is that is how we should deal with it. i hope made it worth your while coming here this afternoon. i hope you have left with more questions than you had when you came in. that was my intent. and thank you very much for the opportunity. and, go air force. [applause]
department that there were increasing security concerns in benghazi? the fbi says it is too dangerous to be in benghazi, which is why none of them are there now. is that because the>> as we dets of what took place there and how that attack took place, it became clear that there were terrorists who had planned that attack. that is when i came to that conclusion. as to who was involved, what specific groups were involved, i think the investigation that is ongoing hopefully will determine that. >> about a day after? >> it took a while to get some feedback as to what exactly happened at that location. >> there was a thread of intelligence reporting that groups were seeking to coalesce, but there was not anything specific, and certainly not anything specific to the consulate that i am aware of. as far as the risks of the fbi reported, you really would have to ask them why they made that determination. >> did you make the state department aware of the intelligence? >> the intelligence that we all get is broadly shared among intelligence agencies and all integency partners. >> i wanted to go
in benghazi? and to that, the fbi says it is too dangerous to be in benghazi why none of them are there now. is that because the situation has worsened or was the always that dangerous in benghazi? >> i think, on the terrorist attack i mean, as we determined the details of what took place there, and how that, attack took place, that it became clear that there were terrorists who had planned that attack and that's when i came to that conclusion. as again, as to who was involved, what specific groups were involved, i think the investigation that is ongoing hopefully will determine that. >> a day after or, was -- >> took a while to really get some of the feedback from what exactly happened at that location. >> there was a thread of intelligence reporting that that groups in the environment in western, correction, eastern libya were seeking to coalesce but there wasn't anything specific and certainly not a specific threat to the consulate that i'm aware of. and, as far as to the risks that the fbi reported to you, really have to ask them for why they made that determination. i don't know. >> wa
partners including the fbi. the intelligence community is devoting more resources to identifying trafficking networks. it strengthened protection so that foreign-born workers know their rights. and most of all we are going after the traffickers. new anti-trafficking teams are dismantling their networks. last year we charged a record number of these predators with human trafficking. we are putting them where they belong, behind bars. [applause] but with more than 20 million victims of human trafficking around the world, think about that, more than 20 million, we have got a lot more to do. and that is why earlier this year i directed my to increase their efforts and today i can announce a series of additional steps that we are going to take. first we are going to do more to spot it and stop it. we will prepare a new assessment of human trafficking in the united states until we better understand the scope in the scale of the problem. we will strengthen training so investigators and law enforcement are even better equipped to take action and treat victims as victims, not as criminals
circumstances. this is a job for the fbi, not the cia. by the way, by and large, most of the information that we knew, we knew it about the guy coming in to try, and it was derived from foreign. our base of knowledge of him was foreign intelligence. to me the right entry point was enemy combatant, n.h. -- agent of war, deal with it that way. the roots of the information are that we should treat this as a law enforcement problem. in broad measure, my sense is that that is how we should do with it. thank you all for coming here this afternoon. i hope you have left with more questions than it had and you came in. that was my intent. they you for giving me the opportunity. [applause] [captioning performed by [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the u.s. house meets in just under 40 minutes to debate 11 built, including a measure to set a minimal premiums for mortgage insurance. later in the week come in temporary funding for the federal parliament for the next budget year. continuing the fiber wall. live coverage at 4:00 eastern. c-span 3 will be live at 3:00 eastern for a dis
, high-ranking member of the f.b.i., director of national intelligence, general clapper and the vice chairman of the joint chiefs of staff to tell us ostensibly what happened in the tragic death of christopher -- ambassador christopher stevens and three other brave americans. so we gathered down in the secret room, which everybody turns in their phones and blackberries, and we went in and listened to basically a description of america's military disposition in that part of the world, something which certainly does not warrant a super secret briefing. but more importantly than that, when the secretary and the others were asked exactly what happened, what happened here, what caused this tragedy? what was the sequence of events? in fact, it was senators, the ranking member of the intelligence committee, what happened? the answer was, well, that's still an ongoing investigation, and we can't tell you anything. we were supposed to be down there to hear what happened, to hear the administration's version of events of what happened. we were told nothing. we were told absolutely nothing. and
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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